Program Directors

Mark S. Sulkowski, MD

Mark S. Sulkowski, MD

Professor of Medicine
Medical Director, Viral Hepatitis Center
Divisions of Infectious Diseases and Gastroenterology/Hepatology
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Baltimore, Maryland

Dr. Sulkowski received his MD from Temple University School of Medicine and completed a fellowship in infectious diseases at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. Sulkowski has been the principal investigator for numerous clinical trials of agents for treating viral hepatitis, including novel agents. He is the co-investigator for adult patients at the Johns Hopkins site of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) Hepatitis B Clinical Research Network. Dr. Sulkowski is a member of numerous professional societies, including the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, the European Association for the Study of the Liver, and the Infectious Diseases Society of America. He has published widely, with papers in the Annals Internal Medicine, New England Journal of Medicine, Journal of the American Medical Association, Journal of Infectious Diseases, and Hepatology. As an invited lecturer, he has discussed the management of viral hepatitis at numerous, major national and international medical meetings.


Raymond T. Chung, MD

Raymond T. Chung, MD

Director of Hepatology and Liver Center
Vice Chief, Gastroenterology
Kevin and Polly Maroni Research Scholar
Massachusetts General Hospital
Harvard Medical School
Boston, Massachusetts

Dr. Raymond T. Chung is Director of Hepatology and Vice Chief of Gastroenterology at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been an international leader in the study of HCV pathogenesis, and his laboratory has made several major contributions to the understanding of HCV-related liver disease. He has been principal investigator of the NIH-funded Cooperative Center for Human Immunology for the Study of Hepatitis C Persistence. He has also contributed greatly to the study of mechanisms of liver disease in HCV-HIV coinfection. To that end, he is currently vice chair of the Hepatitis Transformative Science Group of the NIH AIDS Clinical Trials Group, which has been charged with developing innovative clinical trials in HCV monoinfection and HCV-HIV coinfection. He is also site principal investigator for the NIH Hepatitis B Research Network consortium and the US Acute Liver Failure Study Group. Dr. Chung serves on the Steering Committee of the HCV Special Interest Group of the AASLD and was recently elected to the Governing Board of the AASLD. Dr. Chung has been widely sought after as a speaker on viral hepatitis and has earned numerous teaching awards from Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School.


Taryn Haselhuhn, BA, BSN, MSN, CRNP

Taryn Haselhuhn, BA, BSN, MSN, CRNP

The Johns Hopkins Hospital
​Baltimore, Maryland

Taryn Haselhuhn received her BSN from Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing in 2007 followed by her MSN and HIV Primary Care Certificate from Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing in 2014. She developed a passion for research in high school while working with a team in Costa Rica studying the social behavior of spider monkeys in the rainforest. Her interests in research continued during her undergraduate experience at Goucher College while working with the Preterm Infant Development Study through the University of Maryland. She was then accepted into the first class of the undergraduate Research Honors Program at the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing during her BSN. Her Master’s thesis focused on HIV and aging and evaluated new screening tools for HIV associated neurocognitive disorders. She currently works as a nurse practitioner in the Viral Hepatitis Center at Johns Hopkins Hospital specializing in the management of persons living with chronic hepatitis B and C, as well as HIV co-infection.

Taryn started her nursing career in oncology and worked on the Bone Marrow Transplant Unit at Johns Hopkins Hospital before going back for her MSN in 2013. While working in bone marrow transplant, Taryn developed a passion for working with patients with HIV associated lymphomas as well as patients with viral hepatitis. During her training in the HIV Clinic at Johns Hopkins Hospital, Taryn realized 70% of her patient panel was co-infected with either hepatitis B and/or C and many had cirrhosis of the liver. When the new DAA therapies for hepatitis C received FDA approval, Taryn saw an opportunity to link many of her patients to curative therapy. At present, she is involved in daily direct patient care working in the field of viral hepatitis, including working as a co-investigator on multiple patient-centered research studies. She currently serves as a clinical preceptor for the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing MSN program, the Urban Health Residency Program at Johns Hopkins Hospital, and the Sharing the Cure Program through a CDC grant.